Walter Trout

Walter Trout

John Németh, DJ Pete London

Wednesday Jul 18 2018

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Beachland Ballroom

$26.00

Off Sale

This event is all ages

Primarily Seated, General Admission

DJ Pete London will spin vinyl before the show and between sets.

Walter Trout
Walter Trout
No ordinary artist. No ordinary covers album. From the day he conceived the project to the moment he counted off the first song in the studio, Walter Trout had a bolder plan for Survivor Blues. “I’m riding in my car sometimes,” says the US blues titan. “I’ve got a blues station on – and here’s another band doing Got My Mojo Workin’. And there’s a little voice in me that says, ‘Does the world need another version of that song?’ So I came up with an idea. I didn’t want to do Stormy Monday or Messin’ With The Kid. I didn’t want to do the blues greatest hits. I wanted to do old, obscure songs that have hardly been covered. And that’s how Survivor Blues started…”

Returning with a covers album represents an eye-opening curveball from a bluesman whose original songcraft has never been more acclaimed. Even now, the critical wildfire from 2017’s all-star release, We’re All In This Together, shows no sign of burning out, leading Trout across the planet to auspicious sell-out venues and scoring a head-spinning haul of statuettes. “We’re All In This Together has won four awards for Blues Rock Album Of The Year,” he reflects. “It’s really overwhelming. But how do I follow that up? I’ve always respected guys who went out on a limb, like Neil Young or Bob Dylan. You never know what they’re gonna come out with.”

Likewise, long-standing fans have given up trying to second-guess Trout’s next move. The tracklisting of Survivor Blues is a window into the 67-year-old’s fast-moving backstory, chronicling a five-decade career whose one constant is his deep love of the blues. Opener Me, My Guitar And The Blues tips a hat to cult hero Jimmy Dawkins, whose records Trout devoured while cutting his teeth as a ’60s axeslinger in New Jersey. Nature’s Disappearing nods to his celebrated ’80s tenure in John Mayall’s near-mythical Bluesbreakers. In-between, you’ll find cherished favourites from a lifetime’s listening, with songs that caught Trout’s ear at key junctures in his journey, from backing up John Lee Hooker in the ’70s, to bringing the groove to Canned Heat in the ’80s or breaking through as a solo artist in the ’90s.
John Németh
John Németh
Don’t try to snatch him back and hold him, he’s a man on the move. John Németh had already established himself among the very top ranks of blues musicians and modern soul singers when he decided to break the mold with his new record, FEELIN’ FREAKY. Németh fearlessly crushes all barriers of style and genre with an album of original songs that defies all the usual pigeonholes. Drawing from his strong influences in blues and R&B, as well as contemporary sounds in hip hop and rock & roll, John creates music that is personal as well as universal, and owes its origin to no one but John Németh. John’s songs are groove and melody-driven, laced with thoughtful lyrics and nuanced humor, and cover themes from social issues of gun violence and class values to the pure hedonistic joy of dancing, sexuality and marijuana. He creates his songs from melodies and phrases he draws from the sounds of life, from early-morning Memphis songbirds to the din of the city. For this album John brought his new songs to his great touring band, the Blue Dreamers – Danny Banks on drums, Matthew Wilson on bass and guitar, and Johnny Rhodes on guitar – so they could hone the groove and finish building the album as a group. Under the simpatico guidance of Grammy-nominated producer Luther Dickinson (North Mississippi Allstars), FEELIN’ FREAKY emerges as a modern personal masterpiece.
DJ Pete London
DJ Pete London
Pete London is the frontman, harmonica player, vocalist and un-official leader of Blue Lunch. Pete was one of the original founders of Blue Lunch and has been with the band through all of its incarnations and for all of its eighteen years. At 6'3" Pete is formidable presence at the front of the band and fills the spaces between songs with rapid-fire one liners. Pete relates to an audience with the aplomb of a borscht-belt comic and is every bit as funny. He plays the harp with a full-throated Little Walteresque tone and sings with full-bore enthusiasm. Offstage, Pete is a family man, married to Shelley and father of Eli and Ayla, and works for the Cleveland Public Library system.
Venue Information:
Beachland Ballroom
15711 Waterloo Road
Cleveland, OH, 44110
http://www.beachlandballroom.com/